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of this great service, the happy thought emerged to use part of these letters to show the warm and paternal spirit of pope benedict xvi. most holy father, i ask the benefits -- president obama to personally handle this letter to you. as a man of deep faith himself, he understands how important my roman catholic faith is to me and i am so deeply grateful to him. i hope this letter and find you in good health. i pray that you have all of god's blessings as you leave your church and inspire our world during these challenging times. i am writing with deep humility to ask that you pray fit -- that you pray for me as my own health declines. i was diagnosed with brain cancer more than a year ago. although i continue treatment, the disease is taking its toll on me. i am 77 years old and preparing for the next passage of life. i have been blessed to be a part of a wonderful onfamily. my parents kept their catholic faith in the center of their lives. it has sustained and nurtured and provided solace to meet in my darkest hours. i know that i have been an imperfect human being, but with the help of my
environment for the -- force us to interact with different people. you do not see people with different backgrounds and races in your home and on vacation but you. the problem is we do not get to know each other, because even though racism is over. barack obama has been elected president, we still elect to segregate ourselves. it is not just black people. what happens is we assume because someone looks like us, we get along with them and trust them better. that is not necessarily the case. we just do not take this time to get to know one another. until we interact with each other, we will always have this issue. host: let's put the phone lines up. cspanwj is a twitter account. guest: we are americans. we had 9/111 everyone was to get there because the people who attacked us did not care if we were black or white. there is no question of that. robertson ticket does not wish you as an american -- your birth certificate does not wish to as an american. i think you are right, we do not get to know each other. one of the things that i say on my radio show is that in america we are culturally
us sort of specific descriptions that a medical professional would recognize. what you saw, how you approached the problem, who was doing what. >> ok. the -- the people that were there were -- that i remember and i'm sure there were others, were myself. a nurse, diane bowen, i think, and two interns. marty white who's now -- well, head of the organ bank here in dallas. a lot of people still around. and an oral surgery resident whose name i don't remember right now. oral surgery intern. so that was the team. your job in a patient who's severely injured kind of goes in the steps of do what takes -- keeps each patient alive, then you go back and evaluate the injuries in more detail and make your long-term plan. first, you need a way to breathe second you have to be breathing and third your heart has to be pumping and fourth, head has got to be working, your nervous system has to work. your job is to see what's going of within the airways and breathing and see what's going won the circulation. then you look at neurological function. the -- usually one person kind of takes charge and one
will not be taken for anything by the government other than public use. then there is the new haven firefighter case that others have spoken about. it is not just the decision the judge made without substantial evidence that -- it is also the manner in which they refused to give a fair consideration of the firefighters claims and the way that i would hope that every federal judge will. many of her public statement about judging include very radical ideas on the role of a judge and on society. some have said that we cannot consider those, but to consider only those judicial record and about the statement she has made about how judges should perform in office, i think it's an incomplete picture. she has said that there is no neutrality in the law. she has said that legal uncertainty is a good thing because that allows judges to change the law and to make policy. she has said that foreign law can get the procreative juices flowing for judges to interpret the united states constitution and that ethnicity and gender should have an impact on a judge's decision making. those are hard to square with her sol
are about to see. i think justice souter has been a magnificent justice or any of us who had the privilege of arguing before him and the court. we all know that he was extraordinarily well-prepared, fair minded, extraordinarily probing, and a lucid questioner. he was one knew i would hark back to the great moment when i was able to persuade justice souter to come out to present a eulogy to my late, great colleague and mentor, gerald gunther. justice souter is not a man who likes to travel. he likes new hampshire. i called up his secretary. he loved gerald's but because he said he should approach each case and decided as carefully as you can for that case. he had written him a fan letter about the book. i was unable to get justice ginsberg to come to the eulogy because she was being inducted into the women's hall of fame. i tried justice souter. i called up and the secretary said you never get him to come. is that in connecticut? no, it is in california. he will never go to california. he only likes to go to new hampshire. five seconds later, might line rang, and it was david souter. he sai
eminence, thank you for being here. you grace us with your presence. to all the musicians who have come here, my father loved the arts and he would be so pleased for your performances today. my heart is filled. and i first want to say thank you. my heart is filled with appreciation and gratitude to the people of massachusetts, my father's loyal staff who in many ways, my dad's loss is just as great for them as it is for those of us in our family. and to all of my father's family and friends who have come to pay their respects, listening to people speak about how my father impacted their lives and the deep personal connection that people felt with my dad has been an overwhelming emotional experience. my dad had the greatest friends in the world. all of you here are also my friends, and his greatest gift to me. i love you just as much as he did. sarah brown, president obama, president clinton, secretary clinton, president bush, president carter, you honor my family by your presence here today. i remember how my dad would tell audiences years ago, "i don't mind not being president. i just
it is important for us not to spend all our energy focused on what is wrong with them. we developed an american solution, a fundamentally different approach, starting with the economy. we said, if you want american jobs at american growth and american business, here is a tax policy that will get you there. i challenge you to go out. i suspect virtually any economist will tell you that the policy i just outlined a break 50% reduction of social security and medical -- medicare tax, 12.5% corporate rate, you would have an explosion of economic growth in the united states. . . so they only count oil and natural gas. well, now it turns out we have a new technology in natural gas, we can drill down about 8,000 feet, we can then drill out horizontally four miles in every direction. the result is we're now discovering gas in shale and we have enormous quantities of gas. from western new york through western pennsylvania, through eastern ohio through west virginia and kentucky, all the way down across texas, there is this enormous deposit of natural gas, none of which we knew about five year
the country to start using some of the smart practices that you are using. frankly, medicare and medicaid provide a lot of care for a lot of patients, particularly seniors. if they hear from medicare, can you start doing things smarter, they have the incentive to do it. once they put a smarter system in place, the benefits spillover to the private insurance market as well. we want to do it through medicare and medicaid, but we also want to see in the private insurance market that heah providers start thinking smarter and providing better care, which often turns out to be lower-cost care. it is not going to happen overnight, because a lot of these systems have been put in place for a long time. you are in grand junction or the mayo clinic or another good health care system, each year they are continually comparing notes. they have a peer review process where doctors are exchanging ideas, and they are continually making the system better and smarter, and over time, we can bend the cost curve so that instead of having inflation go a lot faster than everything else, it matches everything else
amendment. so i would have to say. >> you have actually given us a little insight already, but how did your experiences affect you as a person? . . >> i have an opportunity to do things with my bride. we go to football games or we go motor homing. and you try to be as normal as possible with all the security considerations. and i like that. i miss that part of life more than anything else. that i can't just walk around. anonymously anymore. i really truly miss that. but i think, though, the way it's really changed me is that you really -- even talking tonight i'm very, very reluctant to have a strong opinion on something without having briefs or opinions to read and think through. it slows you down. because you know, this job is -- it's easy for people who have never done it. [laughter] [applause] at what i've found in this job is they know more about it than i do. [laughter] >> especially if they have the title law professor. but it also is easy with people who know what they think before they've thought. [laughter] they know how they are going to come out and which position is th
her nomination. and join us next saturday at 7:00 p.m. eastern for "america and the courts." $ >> she will be the first latino american and only the third woman on the supreme court. you can watch all of the senator's speeches on judge sonia sotomayor and the vote at cspan.org. join us next week for "america and the courts," saturday evenings at 7:00 eastern on c-span. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2008] >> from the chicago public library, this is about an hour and a half. >> and now i think we're ready to begin. good evening, everyone. my name is mary demsey. it's my great pleasure to welcome you to the chicago public library for this very special program, "our histories and our stories. " first let me start by thanking juliana richardson and the history makers and g.g g. choza of roosevelt high school for telling these wonderful stories to us. we're delighted to have them here for this very, very special evening. of course, we're disietded to ee dr. henry lewis gates back here at the chicago hub library with rick hogan. it is an exciting night for us
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10